What is an emergency fund?

This one’s pretty easy.

An emergency fund or “rainy day fund” is any money that you have set aside to use ONLY IN CASE OF EMERGENCY.

The purpose of an emergency fund is to be a safety net in case you have an unexpected bill that would wipe out your checking account.

Experts recommend keeping 3 to 6 months of expenses in your emergency fund. That means enough money to pay your rent or mortgage; essential bills like food, water, gas, and heat; and any other recurring costs like debt payments.

What is an emergency

Losing your job

Probably one of the most stressful things that can happen to most people is the loss of a job. For people living paycheck to paycheck, losing that income can spell disaster for their financial life. Having an emergency fund to keep you afloat while you hunt for a new job can take an incredible amount of pressure off you.

Car repair bills

Cars are expensive, man. When one breaks down on you unexpectedly, you might be faced with a bill totaling hundreds of dollars. If you rely on your car to get to work, that bill needs to be paid right away. Your emergency fund can swoop in and save the day, allowing you to pay that bill and get back on the road with minimum life disruption.

Medical or dental bills

If you, a family member, or a pet get ill or need dental surgery, medical bills can come at you fast. Of course, health and dental insurance will cover some of the costs, but you’ll be responsible for the deductible, at least, which can be thousands of dollars.

 

What is not an emergency

A great sale

Seriously. I know the pull of those great sales at Nordstrom Rack, Target, Sephora, etc. But just because something is on sale does not mean you should buy it. If you were already going to purchase that thing anyway, then get it, but with your normal spending money, not your emergency fund!

Upgrading anything

If it ain’t broke, don’t replace it. That’s the saying right?

Raiding your emergency fund to pay for the newest phone, computer, coffee maker, or whatever just because you want an upgrade is not a good idea. If your current whatever-it-is works fine, keep it until you can truly afford to replace it without weakening your savings.

Keeping your emergency fund in a separate account from your spending money is usually a good move. Keeping it just slightly out of reach will help you pretend it’s not there until you need it. Hopefully you’ll never need it, but you’ll be so glad you have it if you ever do.

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